sunnuntai, 11. marraskuu 2018

HID proximity cards – Unique and standardized cards

What is HID Proximity cards?

Like the RFID and other smartother smart , HID Proximity cards are more like an ID card that is known for access control , employee access cards, public transport cards, etc. and make use of Proximity technology for its functioning.proximity card

How do HID Proximity cards work?

A HID proximity cards make use of RFID or a microprocessor that is fitted into an ID card. With the use of special encoder card printer such as Fargo HDP5000 ID, the HID cards while printing is encoded. Along with RFID antennas, the HID proximity cards also have radio receivers fitted in the card which contains the encoded information. When the HID proximity card is placed near to the proximity reader the encoded information present in the antenna which is embedded in the card is transferred to the proximity reader and further undergoes authentication process. The unique feature of HID cards is that these cards do not require to be touched with the Proximity Reader for the exchange of information. On the other hand, it is necessary for the smart cards to be in contact with the Reader to exchange information and get authenticated. The microprocessor is present in a small chip that is embedded in the card, and when the chip comes in contact with the Proximity Reader , the Proximity card gets Verified.

Features of HID Proximity cards

HID key tags and Proximity key fobs and HID Proximity cards are reliable, easy and convenient to use. The Proximity technology used in the HID card provides faster and more accurate reading with 4 "to 24" inches of read range. However, typically the read range is dependent on the type of Proximity Reader in use. As these cards do not require any physical contact for their access, hence they require less maintenance. The HID cards work on RFID technology of 125 kHz. To prevent the card duplication, HID Proximity cards track the sequences of the card number, and the Ultimate user is assured that the HID cards are standardized and can be used by Proximity Readersglobally. And so it adds to flexibility as a single card can be utilized across multiple office locations throughout the world with the assurance that it will be safe from duplication. Furthermore, the Ultimate User as per its requirement can also select the access control system (both in software and hardware form), while using the standard HID Proximity card . Not only that the Ultimate users can also customize the HID cards in the desired size and format. And so all these features add to the versatile, flexible and robust nature of the cards.

Advantage of HID proximity cards

As the read range of HID Proximity cards is large, significant benefits are associated with these cards. For gaining physical access control , HID Proximity cards are designed to meet industry standards and are the preferred choice of security organizations, OEMs, Dealers, Integrators, etc. The HID cards are reliable, reasonably and effortlessly integrated with the physical access control mechanism.

 

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lauantai, 3. marraskuu 2018

Can RFID Invade Your Privacy?

"RFID in your underpants," said radio talk show host Keith Larson, and the comic accusation has stuck to privacy discussions about radio frequency identification ever since.

As long as RFID tags were kept in the warehouse or distribution center, the public had no immediate need for concern. They were out of sight and out of mind, or underpants. RFID tags and their readers help identify with greater detail, and from a distance, thousands of pallets and cartons. Their use in warehousing is, as such, a no-brainer.

They're no longer confined to the warehouse. They've broken out and are now making their appearances as far afield as groceries and appliance stores, even passports.

Some states are taking this incursion as a serious threat to privacy. California state Sen. Joe Simitian has introduced the Identity Information Protection Act to prohibit the use of RFIDs that can be read remotely, and without a person's knowledge, in all state identity documents, such as drivers' licenses, student IDs and medical cards. According to the newsletter Privacy Journal, other California bills are pending that prevent tagging children and restrict RFID tags on non-state IDs.

The push for RFID comes from a Wal-Mart mandate for RFIDs on goods received from their suppliers, plus another mandate from the U.S. Department of Defense. There is also the enthusiasm of companies like Procter & Gamble , Gillette and U.K.-based supermarket chainTesco . They see the opportunity for better warehouse inventory control and on-time receiving of goods.

The inlay of the RFID tag holds a code called the Electronic Product Code (EPC), which is a unique number that identifies the specific item tagged. Once the EPC information is retrieved from a reader, it can be associated with dynamic data in a database as to the items origin or the date of its production, among other information.

Dick Cantwell, vice president for global value with Gillette, sees the positive side of RFID and says the value of EPC will be in its ability to transform business processes in a company's supply chain, "Manufacturers and retailers can reduce out of stocks, increasing retail availability of all products and improve shopper satisfaction," he says.

Those who see the danger in RFID item technology are not necessarily paranoid. They tend to see a society whose citizens are plagued by a growing privacy invasion. The connection between item-level RFID and E-ZPass, where a person's car is tracked and recorded, is hinted at by some, not to mention the e-passport system with embedded RFID devices being tested by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. That system is already being questioned by privacy advocates.

An RFID tag is more powerful than the conventional bar code. It is basically a microchip and an antenna from which readers are able to communicate with the tag. Using it, an authorized party can follow a tagged item from place to place and tune in on the condition of the item and place it geographically. The RFID tag readers can be placed anywhere within a facility like a warehouse or a store and are able to read, as of today, up to 30 feet with a good deal of reliability.

The concern arises when an RFID tag is attached to a consumer item in a store, like a pair of jeans or a sweater. The tag may help the store, and nobody questions that. It tells managers via readers of the tag what is moving, where and what they have to restock, and what has been bought. Item-level tagging can cut down on theft. The same tag, however, could also track who bought it and when.

In Europe, at Selexyz bookstores, the tags are already being used on books but are disabled at the checkout counter. Marks & Spencer is using tags on some items. There have already been trials of tags in the U.S. (demonstrations were made of item-level Levi jeans at a retail show), but they have not been aired publicly. Benetton began to tag but pulled back after adverse reaction.

There is also confusion because some items have a security tag that an unknowing customer could mistake for an RFID tag that has highly detailed identification information from EPCglobal, an organization of industry leaders and organizations focused on creating global standards for the EPCglobal Network. A security tag (known as Electronic Article Surveillance, or EAS) presumably tells the store only if the item has been properly processed and paid for at a register.

Several organizations have taken on the task of regulating tags with respect to privacy matters. SmartCode Research has taken on the mission of creating a solution for reducing privacy concerns by targeting RFID tags associated with ID cards, passports and other short-range devices. Its solution consists of a tag carrying an embedded, miniature push button that connects to the device's antenna. The tag can be read only when the user pushes the button and allows access to the information.

IBM has made a significant move in privacy security, working with Marnlen RFID, which will begin production of its Clipped Tag.

"The clipped tag puts privacy protection in the hands of the consumer, as it gives the customer a visual confirmation of the tags' modification. And at IBM we believe that successful commerce depends on trust," says Dr. Paul Moskowitz, inventor of the Clipped Tag.

"The tag allows consumers to tear off the majority of an RFID tag's antennae, reducing the tag's read range [by a stationary or hand-held reader] to just a few inches," he says. "This ensures consumer privacy and at the same time maintains the benefits of the technology, such as with product authentication or recalls."

The IBM tags are activated by the reader as the power comes from the reader. The tags themselves are passive and do not transmit by themselves.

It is important to understand the actual potential of RFID tracking in a retail establishment or transportation terminal. A customer entering a facility while wearing or carrying an RFID tag will be readable by devices placed within the store, airport or train station. The items being carried or worn will be read by their specific number and correlated with a database connected to a reader that will disclose transaction records, identify the person and give information as to where that person has been and what he or she has visited.

Hold on to your identity, though. New and even more ominous developments are just coming over the horizon.

Chips the size of a grain of rice, implantable in humans and called the VeriChip, have been developed for patient identification by the VeriChip Corp. In hospitals, they may keep track of a patient and prevent all kinds of dreadful mix-ups like lost bodies and improperly lost limbs or other body parts. It also may give pause for thought in terms of the future of implantable lifelong identity tags.

Hitachi's latest tag is slim enough to fit comfortably inside a dollar bill even though the dollar's value continues to shrink. It is just 0.15 millimeters square and 7.5 microns thin. It is readable 10 feet away and can store 128 bits of data. Even George Washington may soon have no secrets anymore.

maanantai, 29. lokakuu 2018

Proximity Cards - Contactless Smart Cards

What is a Proximity Card?

The Proximity card also known as 'Prox' cards are smart cards that have a feature of "contactless technology" and so can be read without the help of a Reader device that is required for reading magnetic stripe cards such as debit or credit cards. In organizations, Proximity cards are used in the form of smart cards to control their employees through a physical access control system. Every employee is provided with a Proximity card, and for entry into the organizations, employees are required to display the card in front of the Proximity card Reader. The Proximity card reader receives the ID from the Proximity card which the Reader further transmits to the main computer. After checking the access database, the system either allows or restricts the entry of the employee.

Types of Proximity Card

 

Passive Proximity cards

 

Passive proximity cards are identified through radio waves signals transmitted from the proximity card reader. And as these cards have limited range and so in order to be read these cards have to be bring closer to the card reader. These cards are generally used in office buildings for access control doors. These smart cards are also used for public transit, in libraries and in payment system.

 

Active proximity cards

Active proximity cards are also known as vicinity cards. These cards uses internal lithium battery. Unlike passive proximity cards, these cards have range up to 6 feet or 2 meters. These cards are generally used for automated toll collection. However as they are powered by battery, they are required to be replace within 2 to 7 years.

There are variety of proximity smart cards and proximity key fobs available in the market for gaining physical access such as kantech proximity cards, HID proximity cards, indala proximity card, AWID proximity cards, etc.

 

Advantages of Proximity Cards

Proximity cards are used for dual purpose i.e. to get both physical and logical access control. These cards are used immensely use in organizations to access better and effective security measures. They are useful for checking access for restricted areas such as technology server, networks, etc. in an organization. One of the other usage of low price proximity card is that as audit reports are generated so they are used for marking employee attendance. Another feature of proximity cards are that they can be programmed to be read by multiple readers and thus they provide more flexibility with addition of new proximity readers and access control systems. For logical access control, proximity cards are also used for digital signatures, digital certifications, web authorization, email encryption, etc.

 

Disadvantages of Proximity Cards

Although the Proximity cards have great benefits, however there are also few disadvantages too. There is a greater possibility that these cards can be lost as these are very light weight. Also many retail outlets and merchandise using Proximity cards for payment transactions. However they find the technology more expensive and thus they charge additional fee from the customer for using the contactless technology.

sunnuntai, 21. lokakuu 2018

Can RFID Invade Your Privacy?

"RFID in your underpants," said radio talk show host Keith Larson, and the comic accusation has stuck to privacy discussions about radio frequency identification ever since.

As long as RFID tags were kept in the warehouse or distribution center, the public had no immediate need for concern. They were out of sight and out of mind, or underpants. RFID tags and their readers help identify with greater detail, and from a distance, thousands of pallets and cartons. Their use in warehousing is, as such, a no-brainer.

They're no longer confined to the warehouse. They've broken out and are now making their appearances as far afield as groceries and appliance stores, even passports.

Some states are taking this incursion as a serious threat to privacy. California state Sen. Joe Simitian has introduced the Identity Information Protection Act to prohibit the use of RFIDs that can be read remotely, and without a person's knowledge, in all state identity documents, such as drivers' licenses, student IDs and medical cards. According to the newsletter Privacy Journal, other California bills are pending that prevent tagging children and restrict RFID tags on non-state IDs.

The push for RFID comes from a Wal-Mart mandate for RFIDs on goods received from their suppliers, plus another mandate from the U.S. Department of Defense. There is also the enthusiasm of companies like Procter & Gamble , Gillette and U.K.-based supermarket chainTesco . They see the opportunity for better warehouse inventory control and on-time receiving of goods.

The inlay of the RFID tag holds a code called the Electronic Product Code (EPC), which is a unique number that identifies the specific item tagged. Once the EPC information is retrieved from a reader, it can be associated with dynamic data in a database as to the items origin or the date of its production, among other information.

Dick Cantwell, vice president for global value with Gillette, sees the positive side of RFID and says the value of EPC will be in its ability to transform business processes in a company's supply chain, "Manufacturers and retailers can reduce out of stocks, increasing retail availability of all products and improve shopper satisfaction," he says.

Those who see the danger in RFID item technology are not necessarily paranoid. They tend to see a society whose citizens are plagued by a growing privacy invasion. The connection between item-level RFID and E-ZPass, where a person's car is tracked and recorded, is hinted at by some, not to mention the e-passport system with embedded RFID devices being tested by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. That system is already being questioned by privacy advocates.

An RFID tag is more powerful than the conventional bar code. It is basically a microchip and an antenna from which readers are able to communicate with the tag. Using it, an authorized party can follow a tagged item from place to place and tune in on the condition of the item and place it geographically. The RFID tag readers can be placed anywhere within a facility like a warehouse or a store and are able to read, as of today, up to 30 feet with a good deal of reliability.

The concern arises when an RFID tag is attached to a consumer item in a store, like a pair of jeans or a sweater. The tag may help the store, and nobody questions that. It tells managers via readers of the tag what is moving, where and what they have to restock, and what has been bought. Item-level tagging can cut down on theft. The same tag, however, could also track who bought it and when.

In Europe, at Selexyz bookstores, the tags are already being used on books but are disabled at the checkout counter. Marks & Spencer is using tags on some items. There have already been trials of tags in the U.S. (demonstrations were made of item-level Levi jeans at a retail show), but they have not been aired publicly. Benetton began to tag but pulled back after adverse reaction.

There is also confusion because some items have a security tag that an unknowing customer could mistake for an RFID tag that has highly detailed identification information from EPCglobal, an organization of industry leaders and organizations focused on creating global standards for the EPCglobal Network. A security tag (known as Electronic Article Surveillance, or EAS) presumably tells the store only if the item has been properly processed and paid for at a register.

Several organizations have taken on the task of regulating tags with respect to privacy matters. SmartCode Research has taken on the mission of creating a solution for reducing privacy concerns by targeting RFID tags associated with ID cards, passports and other short-range devices. Its solution consists of a tag carrying an embedded, miniature push button that connects to the device's antenna. The tag can be read only when the user pushes the button and allows access to the information.

IBM has made a significant move in privacy security, working with Marnlen RFID, which will begin production of its Clipped Tag.

"The clipped tag puts privacy protection in the hands of the consumer, as it gives the customer a visual confirmation of the tags' modification. And at IBM we believe that successful commerce depends on trust," says Dr. Paul Moskowitz, inventor of the Clipped Tag.

"The tag allows consumers to tear off the majority of an RFID tag's antennae, reducing the tag's read range [by a stationary or hand-held reader] to just a few inches," he says. "This ensures consumer privacy and at the same time maintains the benefits of the technology, such as with product authentication or recalls."

The IBM tags are activated by the reader as the power comes from the reader. The tags themselves are passive and do not transmit by themselves.

It is important to understand the actual potential of RFID tracking in a retail establishment or transportation terminal. A customer entering a facility while wearing or carrying an RFID tag will be readable by devices placed within the store, airport or train station. The items being carried or worn will be read by their specific number and correlated with a database connected to a reader that will disclose transaction records, identify the person and give information as to where that person has been and what he or she has visited.

Hold on to your identity, though. New and even more ominous developments are just coming over the horizon.

Chips the size of a grain of rice, implantable in humans and called the VeriChip, have been developed for patient identification by the VeriChip Corp. In hospitals, they may keep track of a patient and prevent all kinds of dreadful mix-ups like lost bodies and improperly lost limbs or other body parts. It also may give pause for thought in terms of the future of implantable lifelong identity tags.

Hitachi's latest tag is slim enough to fit comfortably inside a dollar bill even though the dollar's value continues to shrink. It is just 0.15 millimeters square and 7.5 microns thin. It is readable 10 feet away and can store 128 bits of data. Even George Washington may soon have no secrets anymore.

 

maanantai, 8. lokakuu 2018

Proximity Reader – Control an electronic lock

About Proximity Reader

Proximity Reader is a device that makes use of access control system to keep a check on an electronic lock. The proximity reader produces and transmits radio signals like RFID devices with a low frequency that is recognized by a proximity card, which in turn generate access code which is transferred to the central system to check and control the access mechanism.

How does it operate?

Proximity reader is used for granting or restricting both physical and logical access control by the means of proximity cards. Low frequency radio signals are emitted by the proximity reader that are absorbed by the proximity or smart cards. When the smart cards are brought closer or in the read range of the proximity reader, the radio signals transmitted by the reader get absorbed in the coiled antenna inserted in the card. Once the antenna absorbed the signals, it gets powered and it transfers the energy to the microchip placed in the card. Once the microchip gets activated, it produces a code and further transfer the code to the reader. It just takes microseconds for the entire process. Once the reader gets the code, it further transfers the code to the main system to access the access control database to ensure whether the access can be granted or not. Read range of the proximity reader will ensure from how far the proximity card can be used to seek access. Proximity reader size and the antenna have a great influence on the read range as smaller the size of the antenna; its read range is also low. And hence in proximity key fobs, photo ID cards etc., the antenna is smaller in size and thus it led to a decrease of 40 percent in the read range of the reader. Proximity readers can easily be customized as per the requirement and place where it has to be mounted.

Features of Proximity Reader

Proximity card reader can easily be installed as it works on access control mechanism. Proximity Reader is encoded and designed to get codes from the proximity cards. Due to their versatility, they are easy to place and install on walls, gates, office desk and even on the flat surface. They are supplied with rechargeable batteries and also supports battery backup. Proximity readers can even be customized as per the requirement.

 

Benefits of proximity readers

 

Proximity readers use simple and convenient access control technology. Proximity cards and proximity readers are hassle free as there is no need of moving parts, no or less maintenance and absence of wear and tear, and no slots requirement. It is easy to install and to be mounted, and it neither tamper nor causes any jam. For reading the proximity card, proximity reader does not require swapping of cards. Proximity reader can recognize the card by placing the card in front of it or its read range. Proximity readers are put in company’s entrance or gates or parking lots and garages.